Vitamin Chart - nutritional info about vitamins in fruits and vegetables
Vitamin Chart - nutritional info about vitamins in fruits and vegetables

Dr. Decuypere's Nutrient charts
~~ Vitamin Chart~~

Use these charts to find the nutrient contents of your favorite fruits, nuts, proteins and vegetables.

Click on the buttons below to visit each chart:

Minerals | Vitamins | Fruits | Vegetables | Nuts & Seeds | Legumes | Proteins

Vitamins are organic food substances found only in living things, i.e. plants and animals. They are essential for our bodies to function properly, for growth, energy and for our general well-being. With very few exceptions the human body cannot manufacture or synthesize vitamins. They must be supplied in our diet or in man-made dietary supplements. Some people believe that vitamins can replace food, but that is incorrect. In fact, vitamins cannot be assimilated without also ingesting food. That is why it is best to take them with a meal. Synthetic vitamin supplements can be of varying quality, so it is a good idea to get your supplements from a reliable source.

Note that I have listed only those foods which contain the listed vitamins in significant quantities. For more detailed information, please visit the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food & Nutrition Center.

Nutrient -
Daily Amount Needed

Information

Fruit Sources

Vegetable
Sources

Nut/Grain
Sources

Meat/Protein
Sources

Legume
Sources

Vitamin A - nutritional info

10,000 IU/day (plant-derived) for adult males.
8,000 for adult females - 12,000 if lactating.
4,000 for children ages 1-3
5,000 for children ages 4-6
7,000 for children ages 7-10

Vitamin A helps cell reproduction. It also stimulates immunity and is needed for formation of some hormones. Vitamin A helps vision and promotes bone growth, tooth development, and helps maintain healthy skin, hair, and mucous membranes. It has been shown to be an effective preventive against measles.

Deficiency can cause night blindness, dry skin, poor bone growth, and weak tooth enamel.

Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and retinol are all versions of Vitamin A.

Most fruits contain vitamin A, but the following fruits have a significant amount:
Cantaloupes
Grapefruit
Guava
Mango
Papaya
Passionfruit
Tomatoes
Watermelon

Amaranth Leaves
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Chinese Broccoli
Chinese Cabbage
Kale
Leeks
Peas
Pumpkin
Rapini
Spinach
Squash - summer
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard

Chestnuts
Pecans
Pistachios

Cheddar Cheese
Cream Cheese
Cows Milk
Whipping Cream
Eggs
Tuna
Goat Milk
Goat Cheese
Sour Cream

Most legumes do not contain a significant amount of Vitamin A

Vitamin B1 - Thiamine - nutritional info

1.2 mg for adult males and 1.1 mg for women - 1.5 mg if lactating.

Children need .6 to .9 mg of B1/thiamine per day.

Vitamin B1/thiamine is important in the production of energy. It helps the body cells convert carbohydrates into energy. It is also essential for the functioning of the heart, muscles, and nervous system. Not getting enough thiamine can leave one fatigued and weak.

Note: Most fruits and vegetables are not a significant source of thiamine.

Avocado
Boysenberries
Breadfruit
Cherimoya
Dates
Grapes
Grapefruit
Guava
Loganberries
Mango
Orange
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Watermelon

Asparagus
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Corn
French Beans
Lima Beans
Okra
Parsnips
Peas
Potatoes
Spirulina
Sweet Potato

Brazil Nuts
Buckwheat
Cashews
Chestnuts
Flax Seed
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Macadamia Nuts
Millet
Oats
Peanuts
Pecans
Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Pistachios
Quinoa
Rice Brown
Rye
Spelt
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Beef
Cows Milk
Catfish
Herring
Salmon
Tuna
Goat Milk
Pork
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
Lowfat Yogurt
Roast Duck
Bacon
Pork Sausage
Ground Chicken

Black Beans
Black Eye Peas
Kidney Beans
Navy Beans
White Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B2 - Riboflavin - nutritional info

1.3 mg for adult males and 1.1 mg for women - 1.5 mg if pregnant/lactating.

Children need .6 to .9 mg of B2/riboflavin per day.

Vitamin B2 or riboflavin is important for body growth, reproduction and red cell production. It also helps in releasing energy from carbohydrates.

Avocado
Banana
Cherimoya
Dates
Grapes
Lychee
Mango
Mulberries
Passion Fruit
Pomegranate
Prickly Pear

Amaranth Leaves
Artichoke
Asparagus
Bok Choy
Brussels Sprouts
Chinese Broccoli
French Beans
Lima Beans
Mushrooms
Peas
Pumpkin
Spirulina
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard

Almonds
Buckwheat
Chestnuts
Oats
Quinoa
Rye
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Beef
Cheddar Cheese
Cottage Cheese
Chicken (dark meat)
Eggs
Caviar
Herring
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Tuna
Goat Milk
Goat Cheese
Lamb
Pork
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon
Veal
Yogurt
Sour Cream
Turkey Leg
Lowfat Yogurt
Roast Duck
Hamburger
Beef Sausage
Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken

Adzuki Beans
Fava Beans
Edamame
Garbanzo Beans
Mung Beans
Navy Beans
Pinto Beans
Soy Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B3 - Niacin - nutritional info

16 mg for adult males and 14 mg for women - 17-18 mg if pregnant/lactating.

Children need 9 - 16 mg of niacin per day.

Niacin assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin, and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy.

Avocado
Boysenberries
Breadfruit
Cherimoya
Dates
Guava
Loganberries
Lychee
Mango
Nectarine
Passion Fruit
Peach

Artichoke
Butternut Squash
Corn
Mushrooms
Okra
Parsnip
Peas
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Spirulina
Spaghetti Squash
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato

Barley
Buckwheat
Peanuts
Rye
Spelt
Sunflower Seeds
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Beef
Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat)
Anchovies
Catfish
Cod
Herring
Perch
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Tuna
Lamb
Pork
Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon
Veal
Turkey Leg
Hot Dog (Turkey)
Roast Duck
Hamburger
Bacon
Pork Sausage
Beef Sausage
Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken

Adzuki Beans
Fava Beans
Edamame
Pigeon Beans
Split Peas
Soy Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B5 - Pantothenic Acid - nutritional info

5 mg for adults and 6 - 7 mg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need 2 - 4 mg of pantothenic acid per day.

Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food as well as in the formation of hormones and (good) cholesterol.

Avocado
Black Currants
Breadfruit
Cherimoya
Dates
Gooseberries
Grapefruit
Guava
Pomegranate
Raspberries
Starfruit
Watermelon

Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Corn
French Beans
Mushrooms
Okra
Parsnip
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Spirulina
Spaghetti Squash
Squash - summer
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato

Buckwheat
Chestnuts
Oats
Rye
Sunflower Seeds
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Beef
Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat)
Cows Milk
Eggs
Catfish
Caviar
Herring
Perch
Salmon
Sardines
Tuna
Goat Milk
Lamb
Pork
Soy Milk
Turkey Breast
Veal
Yogurt
Turkey Leg
Lowfat Yogurt
Roast Duck
Hamburger
Beef Sausage
Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken

Adzuki Beans
Black Eye Peas
Edamame
Lima Beans
Mung Beans
Soy Beans
Split Peas

Vitamin B6- Pryidoxine - nutritional info

1.3 to 1.7 mg for adults - 2 mg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need between 0.6 to 1.3 mg B6 per day.

B6 plays a role in the creation of antibodies in the immune system. It helps maintain normal nerve function and acts in the formation of red blood cells. It is also required for the chemical reactions of proteins. The higher the protein intake, the more need there is for vitamin B6. Too little B6 in the diet can cause dizziness, nausea, confusion, irritability and convulsions.

Avocado
Banana
Breadfruit
Cherimoya
Dates
Gooseberries
Grapes
Guava
Lychee
Mango
Passion Fruit
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Watermelon

Amaranth Leaves
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Celeriac
Corn
French Beans
Green Pepper
Kale
Lima Beans
Okra
Peas
Potatoes
Spirulina
Spaghetti Squash
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato
Taro

Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Pistachios
Pumpkin Seeds
Rice Brown
Rye
Sunflower Seeds
Walnuts
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat)
Catfish
Cod
Herring
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Tuna
Pork
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon
Veal
Turkey Leg
Roast Duck
Hamburger
Beef Sausage
Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken

Black Eye Peas
Edamame
Garbanzo Beans
Kidney Beans
Lima Beans
Navy Beans
Pinto Beans
Soy Beans
White Beans

Vitamin B9 / Folate / Folic Acid - nutritional info

At least 400 mcgs for most adults - pregnant women 600 mcgs and breastfeeding women should get at least 500 mcgs.

Children need between 150 to 300 mcg per day.

Folate and folic acid are both forms of B9. Folate occurs naturally in fresh foods, whereas folic acid is the synthetic form found in supplements. Your body needs folate to produce red blood cells, as well as components of the nervous system. It helps in the formation and creation of DNA and maintaining normal brain function, and is a critical part of spinal fluid. It has also been proven to reduce the risk for an NTD-affected (neural tube defect) pregnancy by 50 to 70 percent. Folic acid is vital for proper cell growth and development of the embryo. That is why it is important for a woman to have enough folate/folic acid in her body both before and during pregnancy.

Avocado
Blackberries
Boysenberries
Breadfruit
Cherimoya
Dates
Guava
Loganberries
Lychee
Mango
Orange
Papaya
Passionfruit
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Raspberries
Strawberries

Amaranth Leaves
Artichoke
Asparagus
Beetroot
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Chinese Broccoli
Chinese Cabbage
French Beans
Lima Beans
Okra
Parsnip
Peas
Potatoes
Spinach
Spirulina
Squash - summer
Squash - winter

Buckwheat
Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Oats
Peanuts
Quinoa
Rye
Sunflower Seeds
Wheat - Durum
Wheat - Hard Red
Wheat - Hard White

Cheddar Cheese
Eggs
Salmon
Lamb
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
Lowfat Yogurt
Beef Jerky

Most legumes are good sources of Folate but these are very good sources:
Black Eye Peas
Edamame
Soy Beans

Vitamin B12 - nutritional info

2.4 mcg for adults and 2.6 - 2.8 mcg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need 0.9 - 2.4 mcg per day.

Like the other B vitamins, vitamin B12 is important for metabolism. It helps in the formation of red blood cells and in the maintenance of the central nervous system.

Vitamin B12 is the one vitamin that is available only from fish, poultry, meat or dairy sources in food.

None

None

No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B12.

Beef
Cheddar Cheese
Cottage Cheese
Cows Milk
Eggs
Catfish
Caviar
Cod
Herring
Perch
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Tuna
Lamb
Pork
Veal
Yogurt
Lowfat Yogurt
Hamburger
Beef Sausage
Hot Dog (Beef)
Ground Chicken

Legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin B12.

Vitamin C - nutritional info

60 mg for adults - 70 mg for women who are pregnant and 95 for those lactating.

Children need between 45 and 50 mg

Vitamin C is one of the most important of all vitamins. It plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. Antioxidants act to protect your cells against the effects of free radicals, which are potentially damaging by-products of the body’s metabolism. Free radicals can cause cell damage that may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Vitamin C has also been found by scientists to be an effective antiviral agent.

Black Currants
Breadfruit
Grapefruit
Guava
Kiwi
Lychee
Mango
Mulberries
Orange
Papaya
Passionfruit
Pineapple
Strawberries

Amaranth Leaves
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Green Pepper
Kale
Swiss Chard

Other than
Chestnuts, most nuts do not contain a significant amount of vitamin C.

Cod
Perch
Goat Milk
Soy Beans
Lowfat Yogurt

Other than Edamame, most legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin C.

Vitamin D - nutritional info

5 mcg (200 iu) for most adults. Between 50 - 70 yrs 10 mcg (400 iu), and after 70 15 mcg (600 iu).

Children need about 5 mcg (200 iu)/day.

Vitamin D is known as the "sunshine vitamin" since it is manufactured by the body after being exposed to sunshine. Ten to fifteen minutes of good sunshine three times weekly is adequate to produce the body's requirement of vitamin D. This means that we don't need to obtain vitamin D from our diet unless we get very little sunlight – usually not a problem for children.

Vitamin D is vital to the human body as it promotes absorption of calcium and magnesium, which are essential for the normal development of healthy teeth and bones. It also helps maintain adequate levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood.

None

Mushrooms

No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin D.

Beef
Cheddar Cheese
Cream Cheese
Chicken Breast
Cows Milk
Whipping Cream
Eggs
Anchovies
Caviar
Cod
Herring
Sardines
Goat Cheese
Turkey Bacon
Yogurt
Sour Cream
Hot Dog (Turkey)
Hamburger
Bacon
Pork Sausage
Beef Sausage
Hot Dog (Beef)
Ground Turkey

Legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin D.

Vitamin E - nutritional info

30 IU for most adults. Children need between 6-11 mg/day. (1 IU is equal to approximately .75 mg)

Note: some researchers and medical experts believe that with all of the positive studies using higher doses of vitamin E, this daily recommended intake is not high enough.

Like vitamin C, vitamin E plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. It is important in the formation of red blood cells and the use of vitamin K. Many women also use it to help minimize the appearance of wrinkles, and mothers use it to help heal minor wounds without scarring, as it is valued for its ability to soothe and heal broken or stressed skin tissue.

Avocado
Blackberries
Black Currants
Blueberries
Boysenberries
Breadfruit
Cranberries
Guava
Kiwi
Loganberries
Mango
Mulberries
Nectarine
Papaya
Peach
Pomegranate
Raspberries

Butternut Squash
Parsnip
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Spirulina
Swiss Chard
Taro

Almonds
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Sunflower Seeds

Eggs
Herring
Sardines
Turkey Bacon

Edamame
Pinto Beans

Vitamin K - nutritional info

70-80 micrograms/day for adult males, 60-65 micrograms per day for adult females.

Children need about half the amount, depending on age.

Vitamin K is fat soluble and plays a critical role in blood clotting. It regulates blood calcium levels and activates at least 3 proteins involved in bone health.

Avocado
Blackberries
Blueberries
Boysenberries
Chinese Pear
Cranberries
Grapes
Kiwi
Loganberries
Mango
Mulberries
Pear
Plum
Pomegranate
Raspberries
Tomatoes

Alfalfa, sprouted
Artichoke
Asparagus
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Chinese Broccoli
Cucumber
Kale
Leeks
Okra
Peas
Rapini
Spinach
Spirulina
Squash - winter
Swiss Chard

Cashews
Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Pistachios
Rye

Beef
Cheddar Cheese
Eggs
Anchovies
Lamb
Soy Milk
Turkey Bacon
Turkey Leg
Roast Duck

Edamame
Kidney Beans
Split Peas



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